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Tyronn Lue, David Griffin met with LeBron James to discuss his behavior

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The Cavs' leadership decided to address LeBron's weird behavior with him directly. He responded by playing a good game last night, and then by mocking the media's obsession with him.

David Richard-USA TODAY Sports

It has been a strange season for LeBron James, even by his standards. He's done weird things on Twitter, been overly-friendly with Dwyane Wade, made comments about wanting to play with other players, and so forth. Some of it has been the media trying to conjure up stories, but there's more to it than just that. Many of LeBron's actions have been, well, puzzling.

According to Cleveland.com's Joe Vardon, the team's head coach and GM have addressed these issues with him directly in recent days. According to Vardon, Tyronn Lue confronted LeBron after the Cavaliers lost to the Heat on Saturday (LeBron had been chatting with Wade after halftime while his teammates were warming up):

"I just told him we can't have that, being down like we were and him being the leader," Lue told cleveland.com. "Just me being a competitor, I didn't like it. We had a long talk about it. It was good. He understood, he apologized, and he's been great."

And then David Griffin spoke to him yesterday:

Griffin's talk with James on Wednesday afternoon was a little more general, but was sparked by James' comments to The Bleacher Report that he wanted to play with Carmelo Anthony, Dwyane Wade, and Chris Paul on the same team for a "year or two."

LeBron appeared to respond well to the talk. He had 26 points and eight assists in a Cavs victory over the Bucks last night.

After the game, LeBron mocked the media's obsession with his every move by joking that they would construe his consumption of a banana as a sign that he would "slip on a banana peel out of Cleveland." Richard Jefferson caught it on Snapchat:

LeBron, of course, is not completely blameless. He's given the media plenty of fodder this season. But his larger point is correct. The media dissects his every move and sometimes creates narratives out of nothing. And it's been that way pretty much since he was a teenager. What a life.